Zoners, protesters agree to terms to continue encampment against pipeline in Conestoga

Repost of an article by Ad Crable for Lancaster Online

Protesters of the Atlantic Sunrise pipeline will be allowed to continue their encampment on a Conestoga Township farm.

Zoning officers for the township earlier this week condemned a barn that had been used for a press conference and threatened to fine the group for camping out on the property, even though they had permission.

The township said both were unpermitted uses of a property in an agricultural zone. The action incensed Lancaster Against Pipelines and farm owners Susan and Justin Cappiello.

Repost of an article by Ad Crable for Lancaster Online

Protesters of the Atlantic Sunrise pipeline will be allowed to continue their encampment on a Conestoga Township farm.

Zoning officers for the township earlier this week condemned a barn that had been used for a press conference and threatened to fine the group for camping out on the property, even though they had permission.

The township said both were unpermitted uses of a property in an agricultural zone. The action incensed Lancaster Against Pipelines and farm owners Susan and Justin Cappiello.

But the parties agreed to terms at a meeting Friday afternoon in the township office in Conestoga. Afterward, the parties drove to the farm where pink condemned signs were removed from the barn by zoning officers Joellyn Warren and Kevin Hertzog.

“It was cordial and agreeable,” is how Warren described the meeting.

Jon Telesco, a leader of Lancaster Against Pipelines, said he was “mostly satisfied” at the results of the meeting. “Neither of us had to concede anything. We just worked together.”

 

The group agreed to not use the barn for meetings. The encampment will be allowed to continue with some paperwork allowing its use as a special exception.

Also, the group has to install exit signs for the safety of those staying there and have a fire extinguisher on hand. A military tent that hadn’t met official safety standards may not be used for large gatherings without a permit.

The encampment, known as The Stand,” has drawn dozens of people from the community, colleges and other states, including several people who were part of the bitter protest at Standing Rock, North Dakota, against the Dakota Access pipeline.


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