LAP & the Adorers on NBC

“It’s just a place for us to be able to come, to be calm, to be focused, to be intentional about our resistance and our willingness to go very, very public with that resistance in a prayerful, nonviolent way."

NBC's Phil McCausland and Rebecca Davis came to Lancaster to interview members of LAP and the Adorers. Here's an excerpt of their article (with video!):

“It’s not a traditional chapel, but it’s a marker. It’s a place that says, ‘This is sacred,’ as was the mountaintop with Moses and the burning bush,” explained Sister Sara Dwyer, noting that 300 people attended the chapel’s dedication last month. 

“It’s just a place for us to be able to come, to be calm, to be focused, to be intentional about our resistance and our willingness to go very, very public with that resistance in a prayerful, nonviolent way,” she added. 

And it’s also going to be key in the local resistance to the pipeline, although the elderly nuns will likely attempt to maintain the property through stayed and dutiful prayer. 

“Our hope would be to have a continuous prayer vigil that’s held there, however many people we could get at anyone given time … and basically hold that site in prayer and keep construction from happening,” said Mark Clutterbuck, one of the core organizers of Lancaster Against Pipelines [LAP], a group that has trained hundreds of locals about protest best practices since it formed in 2014. 

Direct action isn’t new to the Adorers. They widely advertise their storied support for women’s issues, the environment and immigrants — increasingly controversial positions under a new Republican White House. Five of the sisters were executed in 1992 while working as missionaries in Liberia. More recently the nuns joined locals and protested a hydroelectric dam in Brazil and a mine in Guatemala.

Read the entire article here.